Live Traffic Feed
SMS Text Message
Phone number


*Standard text messaging rates may apply from your carrier*

postheadericon Welcome Scooter Enthusiasts!

Update: January 2014

Welcome to the new Sky Island Riders LLC (SIRs) BLOG! There is no need to register here, as that option has been deleted due to spammers and bots. You can, however, still comment in our guestbook or at the end of any of the blog entries.

If you are looking for Ride Maps, Club Calendar or Information about exploring southern Arizona by scooter or any other vehicle, you are in the right place. If, however, you are looking to interact with local Tucson scooterists, you will need to navigate to our FACEBOOK GROUP. There was no conscious decision to move there, that is just the way it happened. Our forum here, is essentially Read Only.

If you do not use Facebook, you can still track club events either on our calendar section, or go to our Yahoo! group.

  • Sign up for SMS text messages (bottom left)
  • RSS feeds are also available
  • Club patches available for $4.00 each plus postage


Share Button

postheadericon Gear Spotting

      I enjoy research. I enjoy riding 2-wheeled vehicles. I don’t recall what, exactly, caused me to start contemplating how much protective gear the riders of different types of motorbikes were wearing, but I did. I started thinking about it, a lot. I started wondering how one could objectively measure who was wearing the most and or best gear. Both my wife wife and I hypothesized that sport bike riders probably wear the most gear. Cruiser riders, including Harley-Davidsons, Goldwings and other “Baggers” are known for their lack of gear, particularly helmets. Would they fair better or worse than riders of scooters?
I started by thinking about the most common and most important pieces of protection we wear. I came up with five categories: helmets, jackets, gloves, leg-wear and footwear. I figured that by observing different riders, I could give each a score of zero to five that would represent how protected they were as the rode. It occurred to me a bit later, that this would not be entirely accurate. A guy wearing boots, pants and a pair of gloves, for a score of 3 in my simple system, is probably not as well protected as a rider wear only a helmet and leather jacket (score: 2.)
I then further subdivided my five categories into a few more areas, allowing me to refine my protection observations. Helmets I divided into full-face, other than full-face and none. Jackets are divided into armored or leather, other and none. Gloves are still yes or no. I can’t really get close enough to know how good a pair of gloves are. Leg-wear is divided into riding specific pants or chaps, plain street pants or none, which doesn’t mean that the rider is bottomless, just that they were wearing shorts or a skirt or something other than long pants. Footwear is similar. The best protection is a pair of boots, followed by shoes that cover the entire foot, but not the ankles. The zero score includes sandals, flip-flops or anything that does not cover the entire foot.
This allowed me to make a weighted scale. I increased this to a 10 point scale and weighted each answer consistent with the overall importance of each category. The number of points for each item is as follows:

Item – Points given
Full Face – 3
Other Helmet – 2
No Helmet – 0
Armored Jacket – 2
Other Jacket – 1
No Jacket – 0
Gloves – 2
No Gloves – 0
Riding Pants – 1.5
Plain Pants – 1
Other than Pants – 0
Boots – 1.5
Shoes – 1
Other Footwear – 0

All that remained was to get out and make some actual observations. I did make some “rules” for this as well:

  • Observe at a variety of places around town.
    Observe at a variety of times and days of the week. Thus I could grade commuters and the casual riders.
    Don’t observe around the airbase. The Air Force requires a certain amount of gear. This would artificially inflate the numbers.
    I didn’t want to observe scooters at any of our club events. There is a certain amount of peer pressure to wear gear. Again, this would artificially inflate scooter scores.
    I wouldn’t make observations at any group ride of any type of bike. Again, peer pressure or group dynamics may artificially increase or decrease scores for that particular group.
    I took note of weather and time of day. This first group of observations took place with temps in the 90’s. I will endeavor to do another set when temps cool a bit and see if there is any shift in the numbers.
    I wanted to get a sample of at least 20 bikes in each of the three major types of bikes: Cruisers, Sport Bikes and Scooters. (I didn’t quite succeed.)

     I took observations on 71 different bikes (27 cruisers, 25 street and 19 scooters) on about 20 different days, in about 15 different locations. Temperatures at the times were between 82 and 102 degrees. I only charted the numbers on bikes where I could clearly see the entire body of the rider. I especially liked parking at intersections so that I could visualized the riders’ feet when they stopped.
So what were the results? Well, with only a relatively small sample, my hypothesis is spot on. Using the weighted scale, the numbers look this this:
Sport Bikes – 7
Cruisers – 4.69
Scooters – 3.42

     As a scooter rider, I am appalled, but not surprised. Some time ago, when I was writing an article about hot weather riding, I took random pics of riders on a hot day to put in the article. It was then that I noted so many scooter riders not wearing gear. I know a lot of riders crying ATGATT (All The Gear, All The Time) on forums and on Facebook, but my “on the street” observations tell a different story.
I also looked at averages on the individual pieces of gear. Helmet use (the single most important piece of gear) was the only in which scooterists were not dead last. (Numbers in the table below are percentages.

% Full Face
Sport Bikes – 88
Cruisers –       41
Scooters –      32
% Other Helmet
Sport Bikes – 0
Cruisers –      15
Scooters –     37
% No Helmet
Sport Bikes – 12
Cruisers –      44
Scooters –      32
Total % with a Helmet
Sport Bikes – 88
Cruisers –       56
Scooters –      69

     So, we scooterists came in second place, but still almost 20 percentage points behind the sport bikers. Also of note is that we are the smallest wearers of full face helmets. I’ve seen it reported that 40% of all injuries to the head in motorcycle crashes, occur to the face. Some of us in our Tucson club have personally seen what happens when someone crashes wearing a ¾ helmet. Also, 1/3 of us, aren’t wearing helmets at all.
How about the other areas? Here are the highlights of the other areas I was monitoring:

% Wearing Jackets
Sport Bikes – 48
Cruisers –      15
Scooters –       11
% wearing Gloves
Sport Bikes – 76
Cruisers –       41
Scooters –       11
% wearing NO leg protection
Sport Bikes – 36
Cruisers –       15
Scooters –      58
% Wearing NO foot protection
Sport Bikes – 0
Cruisers –       4
Scooters –       26

     More than of us wear shorts? More than a quarter of us don’t even bother putting on a pair of shoes? If I hadn’t seen it with my own eyes, I would have a hard time believing this.
As I was acquiring the data and as I began to note the patterns, I began to wonder what conclusions could be made from this. Quite frankly, I haven’t thought of one yet. However, I hope this does cause us to think about our choices of what we wear when we ride.
What about you? What do you think about the above? I am looking forward to your comments.

***Call to Action – I would like to expand this research and get numbers from YOUR neck of the woods. If you would like to help out, please send me an email or private message.

Share Button

postheadericon How Far Would You Ride for Pie?

For two or three years now, I have been trying to take a ride on Route 191, formerly Route 666, aka “the Devils Highway.” The part I was interested in covers about 90 miles between Morenci and Alpine, AZ. Those 90 miles are some of the most remote, least traveled miles of any road in the US. They are also twisting, turning, climbing and descending miles of fun for those people on two-wheels.

Routes 191 and 152 have lots of this

Routes 191 and 152 have lots of this

... and this

… and this

Route 191 is on the eastern edge of AZ, very near the New Mexico state line. Because of how twisty it is, much of the speed limit is 25mph and many of the curves have suggested speeds of 10-15mph. That means that it takes 3 hours or more to cover that 90 mile stretch. Therefore, I needed at least 2 days to get from Tucson, ride 191, then get back home. I looked for other things to see/do and other roads to ride since I was going to be out for a couple of days.

I learned of a place called Pie Town, NM a few years back. It is a wide spot in the road along US 60, between Socorro, NM and Springerville, AZ. Pie Town has been around for a long time, and for much of that time, there has been someone there serving pie to weary travellers. What could be more fun than getting a piece of pie in a place called Pie Town? I wanted to include Pie Town in my ride, but it is quite a ways (70 miles east of Route 191) out of the way, meaning an additional 140 miles of riding. Could I find another fun road in New Mexico and use Pie Town as a “way point?” Of course I could.


It's not a proper ride until someone is under a scooter.

It’s not a proper ride until someone is under a scooter.

In 2012, I rode my scooter to Roswell and back, to see my grandmother. I was trying to avoid as much interstate as possible and NM Route 152 which runs between Caballo and Silver City was suggested by a friend (thanks, Sean.) I rode it and found it to be equal to, or better riding than Rt 191. In 2011, I had discovered Route 78 between NM 180 and Route 191. It was another excellent road to ride.

Putting these together allowed me to ride three superb motorcycle roads in one 3-day, 900 mile ride. I figured Day #1 to Springerville, AZ or Quemado, NM via Route 191. Day #2 hits the Pie-O-Neer in Pie Town during business hours, then finishes in Truth or Consequences, NM. (I found out that several hotels there have natural hot spring baths/spas making it an obvious stop for folks that have just ridden 600 miles.) Day #3 hits NM 152, Silver City, then Route 78.

Arriving at the Pie-O-Neer

Arriving at the Pie-O-Neer

I came up with this plan in late 2012 or early 2013 but carrying the plan out was fairly hard. One reason was because the route climbs as high as 9000 feet in places and snow or freezing temps are common much of the year. Another reason is that much of the route crosses serious desert terrain with 100+ degree temps likely from late May through September. Basically, there were 2 small windows of opportunity to do this ride as safely as possible; Mid-May or early October. We tried to do this a time or two, but something would happen and it would delay the ride by 6 months.

This year, I had planned a 7 day scooter tour, which included most of the above. Life happened and I had to postpone the tour, but at the last minute, I was able to to take 3 days off. I decided to give the original plan a try. A couple of friends were able to come along. A huge thanks to my long time ride buddy, John Kiniston and to Randy & Cheri Hays for accompanying me.

Here is my account of the “Pie Town Ride”:

Day #1 – Randy and Cheri have a cabin in Lakeside, AZ, so we changed made our destination for the first night. We would be riding with me on my 250cc Honda Helix, John on his 250cc Hyosung and Randy piloting his 400cc Burgman, 2-up with Cheri. I decided to take I-10 as far as Willcox to give us additional time to spend on 191. (If you want to repeat this but avoid interstate entirely, take US 70 from Globe to Safford, AZ. US 70 adds miles and time from Tucson.) We met at my newest, favorite coffee shop, Yellow Brick. We were on the road by 8:00am and stopped for breakfast at the Reb’s Cafe & Coffee Shop, in Benson, AZ. From there is was another 45 miles mile of I-10 til we exited onto Route 191, (the flat, straight part) then through Safford to Clifton/Morenci and the base of the good part of 191. Since there are no services and few other vehicles on this road, we all topped off our tanks on Clifton. We found Clifton to be a really neat little town and hope that we can return there sometime to explore.

Looking up Clifton's historic "main drag."

Looking up Clifton’s historic “main drag.”


“The Peoples Bank and Trust”



Downtown Clifton


The road begins to climb rapidly through Morenci, which is a town which owes its existence to one of the world’s largest open pit copper mines. There are some spectacular views of the mines as you begin the first major climb of the ride. If you do a You Tube search for Route 191 or Devil’s Highway, you can watch video of various people riding this ride. None do it justice. The camera just doesn’t catch the steepness of the grades or how tight some of the corners really are. That said, you should watch a couple anyway. There are three climbs in this 90 miles stretch. The first takes you rapidly from about 3500 feet, in Clifton, to about 7400 feet. Then it descends to about 6000 feet for a few miles and the switchback carry you to around 8000′. Another descent to around 7000′ then some more switchbacks and cliffhangers take you to over 9000′ prior to reaching Hannigan Meadow. There is a lodge there, but I don’t think they are open year round. They may, or may not, have fuel. If open, you may be able to get a meal there if you arrive when they are serving. We didn’t.

The famous "Arrow Tree" just south of Hannigan Meadow

The famous “Arrow Tree” just south of Hannigan Meadow

Important note: we found the condition of the road surface to back a bit dangerous. The top layer of asphalt is wearing done and, in many corners, has turned into a fine, black sandy material. If you have a fear of heights, there are no guardrails. Also, there is almost a complete absence of caution signs for sharp curves, turns etc. This is in stark contrast to NM 152 which has great signage.

Temperatures dropped throughout the ride. Each time we stopped, one or more of us put on another layer of clothing. We arrived at Alpine, AZ about 4:00pm, with temps in the mid 50’s and a blustery wind blowing. We stopped in for food and hot drinks at the Bear Wallow Cafe. Because this ride was all about pie, I ordered a piece here. It was pretty good.

From Alpine, it was another 70 miles to Randy’s cabin. Temps dropped a bit more and the winds continued. Fortunately, we were in the forest much of this last section and the wind wasn’t too bad. We arrived at the cabin with electricity, for charging our devices but no gas for heat. We got a roaring fire going, which Randy stoked intermittently during the night, grabbed a bunch of blankets and went to bed.

Day #2 – The forecast had called for a low of about 30 degrees, so we planned on a late start, to allow temps to climb a bit. After a leisurely breakfast, we rode out around 10:00am. The problem with waiting until it was warmer, was the fact that John and I still had over 300 miles to ride. (Randy and Cheri would ride to Pie Town with us, but had to return to the cabin to fix the gas issue.)

The wind was with us again this day. Fortunately, it was, mostly, at our backs for the ride to Pie Town. There is some beautiful scenery along US 60, but not much in the way of fun riding. It is mostly long and straight. Pie Town, though, did not disappoint me. As I mentioned earlier, I had known of Pie Town for a few years. Randy and Cheri, though, have known the proprietor for a while. Earlier this year, I was privileged to see a documentary about Kathy Knapp and her pie shop, the Pie-O-Neer. It’s called “The Pie Lady of Pie Town” and it is a wonderful film. I got to meet Kathy at a showing of the film in Tucson, so it was nice to see her and the place the film is about. Business was brisk, but we ordered our pie and enjoyed some time at the pie shop. The pie isn’t the best I’ve ever eaten, but it is very good. If you combine the good pie and the “Pie Town Experience” it is well worth the trip, from where ever you started. By the way, there are two pie shops in Pie Town: The Pie-O-Neer and the Pie Town Cafe’. Rather than competing with one another, they compliment each other. They are open on different days of the week so that there is always pie in Pie Town.

20150508_122457                          20150508_122442              Happy to be in Pie Town

Happy to be in Pie Town


John and I rode out of Pie Town after pie and coffee with about 170 miles of road and wind ahead of us. One, very interesting thing between Pie Town and Socorro is the VLA, the Very Large Array.

John infront of one of the radio telescopes at the VLA

John infront of one of the radio telescopes at the VLA

At least the temperature increased as the elevation decreased. The 85 miles to Socorro is unremarkable. We were both a bit hungry, but didn’t see any place to eat as we rode through the south end of Socorro. The gas station attendant told me that we were only about 10 miles north of San Antonio, NM. San Antonio isn’t much larger than Pie Town but it, too, has something for which it is well known: green chili cheeseburgers from The Owl Bar and Grill. We turned south and stopped at The Owl. I don’t think it was the best burger I’ve ever eaten, but it was good and the service was very good, too.

The main route south, out of Socorro, is Interstate 25. If you are traveling out that way and aren’t in a huge hurry, I recommend driving NM State Road 1. It is the old highway and mostly parallels I-25. Again, there is nice scenery along here. SR #1 takes you through a wildlife refuge and by several ranches. The wind was very difficult. It was very strong with harsh, sharp gusts. At times, it felt as if the wind was trying to rip the helmet off of my head. My scooter would shudder and shake as gusts slammed into me. The worst part of the ride was a 2 miles segment of I-25 from the end of SR #1 to the exit for NM 181. We had to ride through a deep, steep ravine with the wind howling through it. Both of us had “death grips” on our handle bars, but we blew in to Truth or Consequences unscathed.

If you ever get the chance to stay in T or C, I recommend staying at the Pelican Spa. Rates start at $45 and guests get unlimited use of the hot mineral baths from 9:00am until about 11:00pm. The hotel itself is quirky and fun. If you can’t stand bright colors, this isn’t the place for you. We got some tasty ice cream at a little mom and pop shop, spent some time soaking in hot springs, then enjoyed some night air before retiring.


Parked in front of a very pink building at the Pelican Spa. Our room was on the second floor


Day #3 – We awoke with more wind forecast but with highs in the desert in the 70’s. It was in the mid-50’s when we got up, but we still had a lot of mountain riding ahead of us. We had a very nice breakfast at a really neat coffee and pastry shop, downtown, called The Passionate Pie Café. (Another pie reference.) We didn’t have pie, but the eggs, bacon and bacon waffle were delicious. I highly recommend this place if you pass through T or C.

Great service and great food at the Passion Pie

Great service and great food at the Passion Pie

After looking at all the wonderful old buildings downtown, we headed away from town via NM 187. It roughly parallels I-25 as well and has more twists and turns than SR 1 did. You also get a couple of nice views of Caballo Lake. We turned onto NM 152 at Caballo.

The first 15 miles pass through rolling hills with gentle sweeping curves. Just prior to the tiny, yet interesting, hamlet of Hillsboro, there are some tighter sweepers as the roadway drops into the Percha Creek Valley. Spend some time looking around Hillsboro if you pass through.

Beautiful church in Hillsboro

Beautiful church in Hillsboro

The road follows Percha Creek for the next few miles, until you reach Kingston. Kingston has an interesting history (don’t all towns?) but there isn’t much left of the town, now. There is, however, beautiful little cemetery less than a mile from town as you continue on 152. It has the final resting place of the only Congressional Medal of Honor winner I’ve ever “met”: 1st Sergeant James McNally. RIP, sir.


After leaving Kingston, Rt 152 leaves the creek bed and starts climb up the Black Range mountains through a series of switchbacks and very sharp turns. In 7 or 8 miles it climbs more than 2000 feet to Emory Pass (8228 feet.) John and I got off the bikes to take a few pics from the viewing area. The wind was till blowing quite hard and, as I was taking pictures, my scooter was blown over. The 1996 Helix was in near mint condition and now has 2 cracked lenses and multiple scratches and rubs on her left side. I mourned briefly, for my scooter’s lost beauty, hopped on and continued down the road.

The view from Emory Pass, looking east

The view from Emory Pass, looking east

The road down the west side of the mountains is as beautiful and fun as the east side. We stopped for more pictures and a quick rest at the Chino Mine. It is the second largest open pit mine in the world with the first being in Chile. The last time I was through here, I had seen a sign for Fort Bayard. This time we decided to check it out. I am so glad we did. It is an interesting, though eerie place. (Abandoned hospitals seem to be spookier than most other buildings.)


Fort Bayard’s abandoned hospital


Route 152 ends at its junction with US 180. 180 goes south to Deming. If you follow it north, it ends at Route 191 at Alpine. We followed it into Silver City, where we got fuel and lunch at a little downtown diner. At this point, we could continue on Route 180, or turn southwest onto Route 90, to Lordsburg and I-10 home. We weren’t in a hurry and chose to continue on 180 to Route 78 for our last fun piece of road.

It’s about 45 miles from Silver City to the Route 78 junction. About half of that is along the Gila River Valley, which is beautiful. You pass the two tiny towns of Cliff and Buckhorn along the way.


Looking west down Route 78. The yellow sign is one I like to see on a road.


Route 78 is only about 35 miles from start to finish. The first half is very scenic through rolling hills with some fast sweeping turns. You gradually climb back into the trees until you reach the AZ state line. Once in AZ, the road begins to descend. It starts with many tight turns and switchbacks. A few miles later, the sweepers return. There are some spectacular views as you return to the desert.

At Three Way, we got back onto Route 191 (about 10 miles south of Clifton) and rode into Safford. John was on fumes by the time we got there.

There are no direct ways back to Tucson from Safford. You can either go northwest on US 70 to Globe, then south on Route 77, or you can go due south on route 191 to I-10, then take it into town. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Going south is shorter, but you have to go on the interstate. We chose to take I-10 even though the wind continued to blow. (I am okay with riding in the wind OR riding on the interstate, but I really don’t care for the combination.)

New Mexico prairie

New Mexico prairie

Traffic was light down 191 and on I-10. We headed west and made out last fuel stop just past Benson. We talked about it and decided to stay on I-10 all the way to Tucson unless the traffic got bad. It did, so we exited the interstate at Marsh Station Road and then were able to, leisurely, ride the rest of the way. Upon arriving home, I checked my trip odometer and it showed 998.3 miles since my first stop for gas prior to starting the ride on Day #1. Not bad for 3 days on a scooter.

May is a very windy time of year. I think that I will try to conduct future long rides later in the summer or in early fall. We had an amazing time and I am glad to be able to tell people that I rode 1000 miles for a piece of pie.

Here are a few other pics from the ride:


Stopped along route 191


“pie shaped” sopapilla for lunch in Silver City


Christmas lights still hang from this building at Ft Bayard


The colorful open pit Chino Mine


The Spit & Whittle is one of the oldest social clubs in the western US


The Percha Bank building in Kingston, NM


Headstone in the Kingston Cemetery


Kingston Cemetery


Monument along the Camino de Suenos, located off of SR #1 near T or C.


Our colorful room at the Pelican Spa


The one and only


The smallest credit union I’ve ever seen. It’s in Quemado, NM.


Good eats in Alpine, AZ

I love this view of curves and a hairpin turn on Route 191, just above Morenci, AZ.


My green chili chesse burger from the Owl Bar. yummmm.



My pie from the Bear Wallow in Alpine.


Camera battle with Randy on Route 191


Share Button

postheadericon State of the SIR’s 2014

State of the SIR’s 2014

Once again it is that time. The Sky Island Riders have had another birthday and we are 6 years old. November 8 marked our anniversary.

Membership” continues to grow and we had more events this year than last. Our number of riders, however, has been declining a bit. I am hoping to work a bit less in 2015 and leave myself more time for ride/event planning and promoting.

What did 2014 look like?

Members: I will focus only on the Facebook group, since that is where 99% of our activity is. Last year at this time, there were 184 “members” of the Facebook group. This year, there are 237. That is an increase of 53. In 2013, we only grew by 40. As of this writing, there are 2 membership requests pending, as I cannot ascertain whether they are humans or spammers.

Rides/Events: In 2012 and 2013, we had 24 rides or club events. This year we had 32! A 33% increase. There are actually more, but I count multi-day events only once, even though there were actually 3 Facebook “Events” scheduled around this year’s Fall Classic.

Some points of interest: Our “For A Few CC’s More” 3 day rally, was changed, this year, to a 6 day tour around AZ, also know as the 7-Corners Ride. Due, in part, to a perceived lack of interest in attending a 3-day rally, I think we will continue to do an annual, multi-day tour instead of the regular rally. It was a good run and maybe we’ll try it again someday.

On the other hand, 7-Corners was one of the most amazing things I’ve ever done. Five of us rode about 2000 miles in 6 day, going from Tucson to Yuma to Vegas to Four Corners and back home. We have already been contemplating possible routes/destinations for a 2015 tour.

The Phoenix scooter community had some changes this year and there was no Phoenix Scooter Fiesta this year. To my knowledge, no SIR’s attended High Rollers in Las Vegas either. We did, however, make a fine showing at the Fall Classic this month. 13 SIR’s showed up for Saturday’s ride from Tucson to Parker Canyon Lake.

Attendance at this year’s El Scoot de Tucson was way down, as well. We are considering moving this to a different time of year.

We had another multi-day ride called “3:10 to Yuma.” A few SIR’s met up with some Cali riders, led by Doug and Dorothy Hoover. We all met in Yuma and had a memorable time.

It was also great to see some other SIR’s stepping up and planning some events. Earlier in the year, John K. held a few Bikes & Brews events. They were a lot of fun and were held and Maker House, Maker House, unfortunately, has been so successful, that it got too difficult to keep doing the event. I hope John comes up with another location. I was out of town most of the 2 weeks leading up to the Fall Classic. Warren stepped in and planned rides for Friday and Saturday. That was incredibly helpful. Thanks john and Warren as well as anyone else who scheduled an event this year.

2015 Ideas:

  • Another multi-day touring ride

  • 3:10 to Yuma. We are hoping to do it again and increase it to 3 days.

  • I would like to do a month long scavenger hunt

  • Let’s see Bikes & Brews or similar social event to resume.

  • I see that last year in the State of the SIR’s, I mentioned starting a club roster. Yup, it’s still there.

Share Button

postheadericon State of the SIR’s 2013

Well, November 8th marked our 5th birthday as the SIR’s! Yay us!


With two of my kids getting married in the near future, I haven’t had as much time to sit back and formulate our annual “State of the SIR’s Address” but I will post an abbreviated version.


“Membership” continues to grow. Of course, by membership, I am referring to anyone who takes the time to register on one of our internet locations or who takes the time to ride with us.


The number on the Yahoo Group and Google+ are essentially unchanged. Due to so many potential spammers registering on, I closed it to registration. (For anyone concerned about this, registering really didn’t do anything and we had about one real person for every 500 spammers.)


The Facebook group continues to be our most active location. Last year there were 144 members, this year we have 184. There some of those who aren’t active on Facebook at all, some are just lurkers and there are a few who are very active.


I’m not sure how I counted events and activities for the 2012 address, but in counting from December 2012 til the end of November, 2013, it looks like we had 24 events/rides. This is about the same as last year.



For A Few CC’s More III – Attendance at this year’s rally was about the same as last year. Thanks to our sponsors and all those who purchased raffles tickets, we were able to donate $784 to Ben’s Bells. This is up from $752 last year.  Thanks to Sean for making those wonderful, collectible cards that we used for our Poker Run.


El Scoot de Tucson V – We had a record number of riders show up this year. We did have one injury crash at the beginning of the ride but the rest of the ride went well. I think there were 33 bikes start this year’s El Scoot. (For those wondering, there was a big foul-up at the patch place and El Scoot patches are still forth coming. We will announce when they are available.)


**On a serious note: 2013 was a bad year for crashes. We have had at least 5 significant crashes. 3 of these resulting in visits to emergency rooms. There were 2 hospitalizations and 1 person had to have surgery. Not all of these crashes occurred during a SIR’s event, but they all happened to one of us. Please, be careful out there, my friends.


Other 2013 notes:

  • We have had an increasing number of interactions with other area clubs. We have had riders going to Phoenix to ride with VespaAZ and the Phoenix S.C. We also had riders meet with the Prescoots of Prescott. Phoenix and Green Valley riders have been coming to some of our events as well.
  • Stan Scott rode in the inagural “Real Cannonball” from New York to L.A. He didn’t finish, but made it further than any of the other riders. Stan has been active in several events held by the MSLSF (Motor Scooter Land Speed Federation)
  • Several of us represents the SIR’s at this year’s Amerivespa in San Diego. We had a great time.
  • Chaeri & Randy met on a SIR’s ride, fell in love and they were married in November! Our first club wedding.
  • A new Ride Rating System was released. in November. Time will tell if this is helpful, or not.

Looking toward 2014:

  • For A Few CC’s More IV – The 2014 edition is hitting the road for the ultimate AZ scooter adventure. We are hoping to ride AROUND the state. This will be an 1800 mile, 5-day trek.
  • Stan is planning to ride in the 2014 Scooter Cannonball. They will be “racing” from Hyder, Alaska to New Orleans! The race is scheduled to end during Amerivespa. Should be great.
  • We are hoping to have a few of us make it to Las Vegas for High Rollers.
  • We’re looking forward to more interclub events with our friends in Phoenix.
  • We are planing to create a club roster. More info on the soon.
Share Button

postheadericon Ride Rating System

Ride Ratings System

Before I started riding scooters, I was somewhat of a bicyclist. I was a member of the greater AZ Bicycling Association (GABA) and on a number of organized rides with them. They also kept a list of good rides with maps and descriptions (sound familiar?) as well as a rating system for their rides that gave you an idea of what to expect before you got there. When I first started posting ride maps, I wanted some kind of way to rate the rides but couldn’t come up with anything I liked……. until now.

I think I have devised a decent, although somewhat subjecting, system for assigning a difficulty level to the rides which is better than what I have been using. Not only will I be going back and assigning scores to those rides already listed in the “Ride Maps” tab, I will also assign a score to each ride we do in the future to give newcomers an idea of whether or not a ride is appropriate for their current skill level.

Creating this system required that I look at a number of things besides just the ride. For example, if I say a ride is appropriate for advanced riders only, what does that mean? I need to create “levels” of rider skill and then definitions or descriptions of what, in my opinion, constitutes each level. This is a work in progress and is not meant to offend or malign anyone’s riding ability. I welcome suggestions regarding improvement of anything in this post.

Skill Levels

Becoming skilled at riding is something that takes time, effort, education and most of all, miles, miles, miles. Therefore, I am basing my skill levels primarily on miles ridden. I have created 5 skills levels. One thousand miles, IMHO, is what is necessary to go any one level to the next. We, at SIR’s, highly recommend attending the MSF course and recognize it’s value. Accordingly, successful completion allows you to add five hundred (500) miles to your actual number ridden. e.g. if you ridden 621 miles since you got your scooter and then complete the MSF, you can now make your total 1121 which moves you from “Newbie” to “Advanced Beginner.”

By the way, this system is just to assist people in SELF DETERMINING their own readiness for any given ride. No one will be asking for anyone’s mileage numbers to prove their readiness for a ride.

  1. Newbie                                – 0 to 1000 miles

  2. Advanced Beginner  – 1001 to 2000 miles

  3. Competent                       – 2001 to 3000 miles

  4. Proficient                          – 3001 to 4000 miles

  5. Adventure Ready        – 4001 miles and up

Rating Criteria

I came up with a point system where the total number of points determines the overall score, Score is based on points scores assigned in each of 3 criteria. Generally each is given a score between 1 and 5, with 1 being the easiest. Exception: An extreme score in any one of the criteria can push the ride to the highest level regardless of it’s scores in the other areas.

Ride Distance – The longer (time and/or distance) you are in the saddle, the more tired you become. A tired rider has slowed reaction times. However, the more long rides one does, the more accustomed you are to it, therefore, higher level riders are not as affected (up to a point) by distance as less experienced riders. After a bit of thought, I chose 75 miles (roughly 90 minutes) as my unit of measure. Therefore:

  • < 75 miles              = 1 point

  • 76 to 150 miles    = 2 points

  • 151 to 225 miles   = 3 points

  • 226 to 300 miles  = 4 points

  • 301+ miles              = 5 points (add 1 pt for each additional 75 miles)

Road Quality – This is a very subjective category. While the distance between two or more points doesn’t change, road quality can, and does, change. I will assign a score to a given road. However, it may get re-paved and upgraded at some point, or it may get damaged in a storm and down-graded. Any significant stretch of dirt/sand/gravel (I have no idea, yet, how I will determine when it is “significant.”) will result in a score of “5.” This number will be further adjusted by the speed limits of the roads on which the ride takes place. In other words, a rough road in a 25 mph residential street may only get a score of “3” where the same degree of roughness on a 50 mph street would get a score of “5.”

Twists, Hills and Grades – Another subjective category. I think the definition is self explanatory. Like “Road Quality” raw score will be adjusted by the prevailing speed of the road being ridden.

Using the above system will render scores from 3 to 15+.  Following the name of a ride, I will post its score in the following format:

Ride to XYZ: Score RD-2, RQ-1, THG-3 Total = 6

This lets people see why it’s score was given and if they aren’t proficient in a certain, they can avoid rides with high score in that criteria.

 Now to break the points down to match our skill levels:

Ride Score

Minimum Suggested Skill Level

3 or 4


5 or 6

Advanced Beginner

7 to 9


10 to 12


13 or more

Adventure Ready

The ride score is determined by the ride leader of that ride. I encourage anyone posting any future rides to use this scale and prominently post the score somewhere in your description of the ride.

If you have constructive criticism of this system, place send me an email, phone call, text or set up a time to meet with me. As I mentioned before, this is not aimed at anyone and is something I’ve wanted to do since I created the first ride map. Your input is appreciated.

Share Button